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LPC Award-winning newsletter

Celebrating Beef Month:
Specs Still on Target with Consumers

Forty years after defining the brand to meet consumer expectations, CAB® specifications still define a positive eating experience today.

For all the talk of fads and changing consumer habits, this remains: What makes a good beef eating experience today is the same as it was 40 years ago. A new research report details — and updates — the science that still defines the ideal carcass.

“They continue to research it, and we continue to see the same results — that more marbling is better,” says meat scientist Phil “Dr. Phil” Bass.

The 25-page literature review he recently authored for his company is titled, “The scientific basis of the Certified Angus Beef® (CAB®) brand carcass specifications.” It combines findings of 127 published scientific articles to help explain the technical basis for the brand’s third-party-evaluated criteria. Read more.


Kurt Kangas

Kurt Kangas

Association Perspective

When should you market your calves?

As calving and breeding seasons wrap up, many producers begin to look at the marketing of their feeder calves. One of the most common questions producers ask is, “When should I try to sell my calves so I can capitalize on the highest prices?”


Chasing the summer video markets can be a frustrating experience, and using last year’s highs and lows to determine when to place this year’s calves isn’t always the best strategy. In the past two years, if you sold calves in June each year you would have captured a seasonal high last year, while catching a seasonal low the previous year. Read more.


Angus Breed Sets Pace for Quality

Mid-year reports from the member organization reflect growing demand for Angus genetics.

The American Angus Association’s more than 25,000 members continue to set the pace for the beef cattle industry, bolstered by a growing demand for registered-Angus genetics nationwide.


According to reports released by the Association, breeders have registered 7% more Angus animals during the first half of the fiscal year compared to the same time period a year ago. Association reports for March alone showed an 18% boost in registrations compared to the same month in 2015.


“The Angus business is performing really well halfway through the year,” says Allen Moczygemba, Association CEO. “We’re on pace again for an outstanding year in registrations following one of the breed’s best years on record. If we continue this growth, we could see our 15th-largest registration level in the history of our 133-year-old organization.” Read more.


Junior Angus Member Rallies
Community to Feed Families in Need

Texas FFA and 4-H members donate beef and pork.

Center of the Plate, a nonprofit, public charity, donated more than 1,200 pounds (lb.) of beef and pork to four families in need in Dripping Springs, Texas. Through combined efforts with their community, Dripping Springs FFA and 4-H members are driving Center of the Plate energies to provide essential meat protein to 22 family members.


“Our desire with this initiative is to have a deep impact on multiple families in our community,” said Grace Baxter, co-founder of Center of the Plate and National Junior Angus Association (NJAA) member. “Providing over 300 pounds to each family will result in meat on the table for at least four months.” Five market hogs and one market steer were donated by FFA and 4-H members to the Center of the Plate for processing into beef and pork. The steer was an Angus-cross donated by Baxter from her own herd. Read more.


What’s Inside …

In this May edition of the Angus Beef Bulletin EXTRA, you'll find valuable articles devoted to the management, marketing, and health and nutrition of your beef enterprise. Select from the tabs at the top of the page to access this month’s entire offering by category. A few select features include:


News Briefs …

The American Angus Association and its subsidiaries generate a wealth of information to keep members and affiliates informed of what's happening within the industry, as well as with the programs and services they offer. Click here for easy access to the newsrooms of the American Angus Association and Certified Angus Beef LLC and the Angus Journal Daily archive available in the API Virtual Library.


Purdue Survey Finds ‘Agritourists’
Have Environmental Concerns

While most agricultural tourists responding to a Purdue University survey indicated that agriculture is an important industry, those who said they had visited a livestock farm tended to have concerns about how animal feeding operations affect water quality in their county.


The results suggest that livestock producers who open their operations to “agritourists” will have a receptive audience, but should be prepared to potentially address questions about environmental concerns, said Nicole Olynk Widmar, associate professor of agricultural economics and co-author of the study "Exploring Agritourism Experience and Perceptions of Pork Production." Read more.


Your Health

Click It or Ticket Campaign
Urges Drivers to Buckle Up

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service safety expert is urging drivers to take a few seconds to save their own lives.

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service is helping promote the Click It or Ticket campaign May 23 through June 5, which includes the Memorial Day weekend. The campaign is working to get more pickup truck drivers to buckle up.


“Taking about three seconds to buckle your seat belt is the most important step you can take to protect yourself in a crash,” said Bev Kellner, AgriLife Extension program vehicle safety specialist, College Station. “While most Texans now routinely buckle up, some groups of motorists still aren’t consistently using seat belts. Statistics show those most likely to be unrestrained are men and young adults, especially pickup truck drivers and passengers.” Read more.